COURSE OUTLINE
Last Revised and Approved: 10/08/2015
LIBR 201H - Research in the Digital Age (Honors)
Units Lecture 0.00 Units Lab 0.00 Units Total 0.00
 
Lecture Weekly Contact Hours 0.00 Lab Weekly Contact Hours 0.00 Total Weekly Contact Hours 0.00
 
Lecture Weekly Outside of Class Hours 0.00 Lab Weekly Outside of Class Hours 0.00 Total Weekly Outside of Class Hours 0.00
 
Total Semester Hours 0.00 - 0.00 Total Outside of Class Hours 0.00 - 0.00
 
Typically Offered: Fall - F
Course Description
This honors course gives highly motivated students the opportunity to explore the complex digital information landscape and teaches students critical research skills necessary for scholarly inquiry. Students employ multiple Web technologies and advanced search strategies to navigate, assess, and communicate information from diverse sources and formats. The course emphasizes critically evaluating and analyzing appropriate sources as well as responsible and ethical uses of information. UC CREDIT LIMITATION: Credit for LIBR 201 or LIBR 201H.
Enrollment Restrictions
Not open to students with prior credit in
LIBR 201

Outline of Course Lecture Content
The course lecture will address the following topics:

I. Nature and characteristics of information

A. Primary and secondary

B. Objective and subjective

C. Factual and analytical

D. Popular and scholarly.

II. Critical evaluation of information

A. Authority

B. Point of view

C. Accuracy

D. Relevancy

E. Currency.

III. Organization of information

A. Production and dissemination of information

B. Popular publication processes

C. Scholarly publication processes

D. Publishing information online.

IV. Technological tools of research

A. Federated search engines

B. Formats of online information

C. Streaming multimedia.

V. Research process

A. Identifying information need

B. Developing and focusing a topic

C. Developing search strategies

1. Keyword and natural language searching

2. Boolean operators

3. Subject searching

4. Field searching

5. Advanced searching.

D. Evaluating and refining search strategies.

VI. Diverse sources of information

A. Social media technologies (Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, blogs)

B. Print (books, periodicals)

C. Web (books, periodicals, websites)

D. Subscription (library) databases.

VII. Legal and ethical uses of information

A. Plagiarism

B. Citing sources

1. Citation elements

2. APA and MLA styles

3. Web citation tools.

C. Copyright and ownership

D. Privacy

E. Ethical use.

VIII. Emerging trends

A. User generated content

B. Mobile applications

C. Personalized Web experience.



Outline of Course Lab Content
The course lab will address the following topics:
Performance Objectives
Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to do the following:

1). Discuss the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding access to, and the use of, information

2). Select and focus a research topic and construct a thesis statement

3). Utilize multiple Web-based technologies to meet stated information needs

4). Design, test, and evaluate search strategies utilizing Boolean operators and advanced search techniques

5). Critically evaluate the credibility, quality, and relativity of information using a prescribed set of criteria

6). Explain popular and scholarly publication processes in multiple formats (print, Web, etc.)

7). Design and publish an informational website using a Web content management system (e.g., WordPress, Joomla, Google sites)

8). Distinguish between academic and popular sources of information

9). Identify citation elements in a variety of information sources and apply a citation style in referencing information

10). Prepare oral/and or written presentations of research projects independently and in small groups.
Reading Assignments
Reading assignments will be consistent with, but not limited by, the following types and examples:

1). Read assigned periodical articles or selections from e-books

2). Conduct research and read source material to complete independent research project

3). Read assigned Web pages, tutorials, and discussion postings 

4). Conduct independent reading of scholarly literature relevant to course outline and course objectives.

Writing Assignments
Writing assignments will be consistent with, but not limited by, the following types and examples:

1). Prepare extensive written responses to questions and exercises

2). Prepare essays and short critical paragraphs that utilize research and synthesize course objectives

3). Contribute ideas and provide feedback to online discussion groups

4). Provide written peer evaluations of assignments

5). Write a research paper, create an annotated bibliography, and/or prepare formal presentations of research findings.

Outside-of-Class Assignments
Outside-of-class assignments will be consistent with, but not limited by, the following types and examples:

1). Study course materials, such as videos, tutorials, and articles, to prepare for in-class discussions, tests, exercises, and presentations

2). Complete individual reading, writing, and research assignments

3). Create, upload, and share an informative research-based website

4). Prepare presentations of research projects independently and in small groups

5). Attend class field trips (physical or virtual) to university libraries and/or academic publishers.

Student Learning Outcomes
  1. Given a specific research topic, the student will develop and execute an effective research strategy utilizing advanced search techniques.​
  2. Student will critically evaluate the credibility and quality of an information source by applying a prescribed set of criteria.​
  3. The student will identify citation elements in a variety of information sources and consistently apply a citation style in referencing information. ​
  4. The student will compare and contrast characteristics of popular and scholarly information sources.​
Methods of Instruction
Instructional methodologies will be consistent with, but not limited by, the following types or examples:

1) Instructor-guided lecture and hands-on instruction

2). Highly interactive lectures where students help to reveal the critical principles of the course

3). Group participation in interactive classroom activities to promote engagement and active learning

4). Instructor-guided discussion to enhance student understanding of course topics

5). Recorded videos and tutorials to reinforce lectures

6). Seminar-style, small-group, and student-led synchronous and/or asynchronous discussions

7). Use of supervised student-led field activities to engage students in active learning and teaching of other students

8). Assignments designed to develop student research skills.                                                                                                               

Methods of Evaluation
Evaluation methodologies will be consistent with, but not limited by, the following types or examples:

1). Instructor evaluation of written work (assignments, final research project, quizzes) to assess student's ability to consistently apply a citation style and to critically evaluate information using a prescribed set of criteria

2). Instructor evaluation and/or peer evaluation of individual or group presentations to assess student's ability to articulate the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding access to, and the use of, information

3). Instructor evaluation of participation in and contributions to group related tasks and projects 

4). Peer evaluation of written work, class discussions, and/or presentations to assess student's ability to distinguish between academic and popular sources of information and to explain popular and scholarly publication processes in multiple formats

5). Demonstrated skill and critical thinking in accessing, selecting, evaluating, documenting, and synthesizing scholarly literature.

Required Textbooks
Examples of typical textbooks for this course include the following:
  1. Badke, William . Research Strategies: Finding Your Way Through the Information Fog . 5th, iUniverse, 2014. 978-1491722336
  2. Hacker, Diana, and Barbara Fister. Research and Documentation in the Digital Age. 6th, Bedford/St. Martin's, 2014. 978-1457650697
  3. Lanning, Scott . Concise Guide to Information Literacy. 1st, Libraries Unlimited, 2012. 978-1598849493
Other Required Instructional Materials
None.
Course Repeatability
Total Completions Allowed: 1
Fulfills MiraCosta College Associate Degree Requirements
MiraCosta General Education
Articulation
Transfer Status: Acceptable for Credit: CSU, UC
CSU/IGETC GE Area(s): 103 - CSU, UC
This course is incorporated into the following program(s)
Certificate of Proficiency *CURRENT* Research Fundamentals